Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

''I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that was given you in Christ Jesus, that in every way you were enriched in him in all speech and all knowledge—'' Romans 16:4-5 ESV


Thanksgiving

EASTER ~ JESUS

EASTER ~ JESUS ~ HE IS RISEN

GOOD FRIDAY

COMMUNION SERVICE

PALM SUNDAY HOSANNA TO THE KING

HOLY WEEK: Sunday, April 13, 2014 ~ Sunday, April 20, 2014


EASTER ~ JESUS

Series: Fighting For Your Family

Series: Fighting For Your Family
Click Image. Let the Children Come to Me ~ Series: Fighting For Your Family ~ Part Six ~ Children, God’s Special Gift. Matthew 18:1-6; Ephesians 6:1-4 ESV. Image: Children Silhouette.

Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday

Primitive Baptists

Biblical Inspiration and Biblical Inspiration 1

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Thursday, October 28, 2010

Love Language Minute ~ 4 Ingredients to Deeper Sexual Intimacy Within Marriage ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 30, 2010 ~ "Dear Gary" ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman

The Family You’ve Always Wanted
Five Ways You Can Make It Happen
by Gary Chapman


Dr. Gary Chapman


Love Language Minute ~ 4 Ingredients to Deeper Sexual Intimacy Within Marriage ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 30, 2010 ~ "Dear Gary" ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman


4 Ingredients to Deeper Sexual Intimacy Within Marriage
Dr. Gary Chapman


What is Intimacy?

Intimacy between the husband and wife is one of the characteristics of a healthy marriage. One of the problems is that we have different ideas as to what it means to have intimacy. For some husbands "intimacy" means "sex". For most wives intimacy is something far more emotional. In fact, without emotional closeness, sex may be meaningless.

What is intimacy? It is that sense of closeness that comes when we share our lives deeply with each other. We spend time together. We share our opinions, desires, and feelings. We do things together socially. We let each other in on our spiritual journey. We pray together. And yes, we have sex together. Intimacy involves sharing all of life. That is what marriage is all about.

Intellectual Intimacy: We Tell Our Thoughts

From the moment we awake, our minds are active. All day long we think, we interpret, we decide-all in the secret realm of our mind. We all have desires. For some, desire will motivate them to walk to Starbucks for a Tall Double Skinny Iced Mocha with a shot of almond. For others, just my mention of coffee got their mind in a tizzy. The truth is that everyone's mind is active with thoughts, whether sitting next to someone or miles apart.

Intellectual intimacy begins the moment we share these thoughts with someone. Obviously, we need to be somewhat selective-it would take a more than a lifetime to share every single thought we process. When spouses share their thoughts, desires, and perspectives on what they have experienced with one another on a regular basis, you can be sure that their level of intellectual intimacy is rich and deep. On the other hand, those that choose to reveal none of their thoughts will see the death of intellectual intimacy in their marriage.

Emotional Intimacy: We Discuss Our Feelings

We often hear couples talk about emotional intimacy; but what does that mean? Essentially, it is the sharing of emotions in an accepting atmosphere. All day long, life is filled with feelings. You put your dollar in the drink machine and receive no drink (and no change). You have feelings. You are informed that the company is going to "downsize." You have feelings.

Emotional intimacy is that sense of closeness that comes when you choose to share your emotions with each other in an effort to know each other more deeply. For this to happen, we must create an atmosphere of acceptance. "I can see how you might feel hurt by that. Is there anything I can do to help?" Such a response encourages emotional intimacy.

Social Intimacy: We Spend Time Together & Discuss Time Spent Apart

In a healthy marriage there will be "social intimacy" between husband and wife. Social intimacy has to do with spending time together; going to a movie or attending an athletic event. Or, we may go bowling, or plant a tree, or go shopping together. Much of life involves "doing". When we do things together, we are enhancing our sense of intimacy.

On the other hand, most couples spend several hours each day apart. While apart they each have various social encounters. At the end of the day, if they share some of these encounters, they are building social intimacy. Letting each other in on their time apart. On a scale of 1 to 10 how much social intimacy do you feel in your marriage?

Spiritual Intimacy: We Open Our Souls to Each Other

One of the most common complaints I hear from Christian wives is that they want to have a deeper level of "spiritual intimacy" with their husbands. I believe there are two ways to build spiritual intimacy. One is by shared experience. Attending worship together and holding hands while the minister prays. Making time to pray together daily - even if it is silent prayer; or attending a couples bible study.

Another approach is to discuss with each other some of your thoughts about spiritual realities. It may be as simple as sharing what you read in your quiet time this morning, while your spouse listens attentively and affirms your insights. Spiritual intimacy is an important part of marriage.

Sexual Intimacy: We Share Our Bodies

Why is sexual intimacy so illusive for many couples? I believe it is because we have separated it from intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual intimacy. Intimacy is that sense of closeness that comes when we share life deeply with each other. But it cannot be limited to the sharing of our bodies. When we are critical, demanding, and verbally abusive, and then try to have sex we will not experience intimacy.

Sexual intimacy flows naturally from a loving marital relationship. If you want greater sexual intimacy then focus on building closeness in the other areas of life. Spend time together, give affirming words, pray together, apologize for your failures. This is the road to sexual intimacy.

Adapted from The Family You've Always Wanted by Dr. Gary Chapman.




Building Relationships Radio
Saturday, October 30, 2010

"Dear Gary"

With

Dr. Gary Chapman


Co-host











Chris and Andrea Fabry



Building Relationships Radio
Saturday, October 30, 2010
"Dear Gary"

Do you have a desperate marriage? Are you wondering about a dating relationship? Have problems with an in-law? Have a wayward child? We'll tackle questions like these on this October edition of Dear Gary. Dr. Gary Chapman is the N.Y. Times bestselling author of The 5 Love Languages, and you'll hear him answer a variety of listener questions. Don't miss it!


Featured Resource:
The 5 Love Languages® by Dr. Gary Chapman

Tune in to Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, the weekly radio broadcast brought to you by Moody Radio and Moody Publishers. Listen live online Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. CST at moodyradio.org, check your local radio station, or download free podcasts and get more information.

View an archive of past emails.
Link: MBN Radio Live Stream


Building Relationships Radio
11:00 a.m. Eastern Time

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Love Language Minute ~ What Love Really Means ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 23, 2010 ~ "Hello, I Love You!" by Ted Kluck ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman

Hello, I Love You
 by Ted Kluck
 The Family Man He lives in Grand Ledge, MI
with  his wife Kristin and sons Tristan and Maxim

Hello, I Love You
Adventures in Adoptive Fatherhood
by Ted Kluck

The Marriage You've Always Wanted
by Dr. Gary Chapman.

Dr. Gary Chapman


Love Language Minute ~ What Love Really Means ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 23, 2010 ~ "Hello, I Love You!" by Ted Kluck ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman


What Love Really Means
Dr. Gary Chapman


Explore the foundation
When couples come to me for pre-marital counseling, I sometimes ask: "Why do you want to get married?" They always seem to give me the big reason; and the big reason is always the same. What do they say? "We love each other." Then I ask a very unfair question: "Tell me, What do you mean by that?" There is silence. Then, one will say, "Oh... you know!"

I guess maybe I do know. I think they are talking about a euphoric emotion that makes them oblivious to reality. They are the happiest they have ever been. What they don't know is that the euphoric feelings will last for two years and then they must find another foundation for marriage. Wouldn't it be better to explore that foundation before they get married?

What is love?
One definition says, "Love is the feeling that you feel when you feel a feeling like you've never felt before." If that is your definition of love, I can tell you, that kind of love will never lead you to a life-long marriage. The euphoric feels are temporary. It is interesting that in Eph. 5:25 husbands are commanded to love their wives. If the intense feelings of love were permanent, why would God command a husband to love his wife?

The fact is, they are not permanent and love is not a feeling, but an attitude, with appropriate behavior. Love is the attitude which says, "I'm married to you, so what can I do to help you? Love is choosing to be kind, and supportive. Is that your attitude?

Love as a way of life
Most people get married based on love. However their concept of love often focuses on feelings. I read one definition which said, "Love is a four-letter word composed of two consonants, L and V; two vowels, O and E; and two fools, you and me." There is some truth to that, and fools often make poor decisions.

In the Bible, love is not a euphoric feeling, but a way of life. In Titus chapter two the older women are instructed to teach the young wives to love their husbands. This implies that love can be learned. It is not something that happens to you. It is something you choose. Once you choose to love, then you look for appropriate ways to express it. This kind of love will lead you to a life-long productive marriage.

Learning to love
"I don't love her anymore." How many times have I heard that in my office! What is that supposed to mean? Usually, it means that he has lost the euphoric feelings he had for her when they got married. And that their differences have emerged and ended in arguments. The fact is, everyone loses the euphoric feelings. They usually last for only two years.

Then, we must learn to love. We must choose to treat each other with respect. We must listen to differences of opinion and try to find a solution. We must learn to work together as a team; using our differences for the benefit of the team. This attitude is commanded by God.

Love that makes marriage enjoyable
Would you like to know what love looks like in a marriage? Then, turn to I Corinthians chapter 13. Listen to these words: "Love is patient and kind; is not arrogant or rude; It does not insist on it's own way; it is not resentful; Love does not bring up past failures, but chooses to forgive." Does this describe your attitude and treatment of your spouse?

This is the kind of love that makes for happy marriages. Love focuses on meeting the needs of the spouse; helping them succeed; listening to their thoughts and feelings. In short, it is giving your life away for your spouse. That is precisely what Christ did for us, and it is what husbands are instructed to do for their wives. Love is powerful.


Adapted from The Marriage You've Always Wanted by Dr. Gary Chapman.




Building Relationships Radio


Saturday, October 23, 2010


"Hello, I Love You!"


by Ted Kluck
 
With
 
 
Dr. Gary Chapman
 
 
Co-host

Chris and Andrea Fabry



Saturday, October 23, 2010
Building Relationships Radio
"Hello, I Love You!"
Ted Kluck


Adoption is a wonderful process where two parents welcome a child into their home. But for some, the experience is expensive, exhausting, and heartbreaking. On the next Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, Ted Kluck takes you into the world of international adoption. He and his wife adopted two boys from Ukraine-and you'll hear their emotional story.

Featured Resource:
Hello, I Love You by Ted Kluck

Tune in to Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, the weekly radio broadcast brought to you by Moody Radio and Moody Publishers. Listen live online Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. CST at moodyradio.org, check your local radio station, or download free podcasts and get more information.


Excerpt:  Hello, I Love You Adventures in Adoptive Fatherhood


Video:  Ted Speaks to Fathers


View an archive of past emails.
Link: MBN Radio Live Stream
Building Relationships Radio
11:00 a.m. Eastern Time


Friday, October 15, 2010

Love Language Minute ~ Handling Anger in a Healthy Way ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 16, 2010 ~ "The 5 Love Languages on Detroit Public Television" ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman

Love Language Minute ~ Handling Anger in a Healthy Way 
Anger ~ Handling a Powerful Emotion in a Healthy Way
 by Gary Chapman.

Dr. Gary Chapman


Love Language Minute ~ Handling Anger in a Healthy Way ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 16, 2010 ~ "The 5 Love Languages on Detroit Public Television" ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman


Handling Anger in a Healthy Way
Dr. Gary Chapman


Uncontrolled anger can destroy your marriage!
All of us get angry when we feel that we have been wronged. Feeling angry is not sinful, but how you respond may be. In Ephesians 4:26 we read: "Being angry, sin not, don't let the sun go down on your anger." We are responsible for controlling our behavior. The husband or wife who lashes out in anger with harsh words or hurtful behavior is sinning.

The first step in learning to control your anger is to restrain your immediate response. Count to 100 before you do anything. Take a walk around the block. Go water your flowers. Do something to stop the flow of hurtful words or abusive behavior. Take a "time out" and you're less likely to sin.

Many marriages have been destroyed by uncontrolled anger. The feeling of anger is not sinful. Even God feels anger. Great social reforms have been motivated by anger. But uncontrolled anger has destroyed the lives of thousands. If you feel angry, admit it, and ask God to help you take positive action.

One constructive step is to ask: Am I angry because someone sinned against me? Or, because I did not get what I wanted? If someone sinned, you should be angry. That is godly anger. However, much of our anger is distorted - things simply did not go our way. If this is the case, we need to confess our selfish response, accept God's forgiveness and release our anger to Him.

If someone sins against us, it's natural to get angry!
Even God get's angry when people sin. He moves out in love to convict, discipline, and correct. Should we do less? In marriage when our spouse sins against us, we get angry. God's purpose for anger is that it motivate us to lovingly confront. We dare not sit idly by and make no effort to help our spouse turn from sin.

When I say lovingly confront, I'm not talking about yelling and screaming at your spouse. I'm suggesting you say something like this: "I'm deeply hurt by your behavior. I'm concerned about you and about us. Please, can we talk about this?" If they are unwilling to talk; you pray and try again. Love does not accept sinful behavior.

Is uncontrolled anger a problem in your marriage?
"A fool gives full vent to his anger, but a wise man keeps himself under control" Proverbs 29:11. Do you control yourself when you are angry? If not, it's time to take action. Admit to God that in your anger you have sinned. If you lost your temper with your spouse, then apologize and ask them to forgive you.

The next time you are angry, take a "time out" and pray. Ask God to show you the best way to respond to your anger. Ask yourself, "Why am I angry? What wrong was committed? What positive action might I take? What would be the loving thing to do?" Take constructive action and anger has served its purpose.

Handle anger in a positive way
In my book: Anger: Handling a Powerful Emotion in a Healthy Way, I suggest that couples write the following words on an index card and put it on the refrigerator door. When they feel angry toward a family member, they get the card and read it to the person at whom they are angry. Here's what the card says:

"I'm feeling angry right now, but don't worry. I'm not going to attack you. But I do need your help. Is this a good time to talk?" It brings a little humor into the tenseness, and it reminds me what I am not going to do - (lose my temper). It also asks for their help in dealing with my anger. Try it! It may become a family tradition.


Adapted from Anger: Handling a Powerful Emotion in a Healthy Way by Dr. Gary Chapman.





The 5 Love Languages with Dr. Gary Chapman DVD
 "The 5 Love Languages ~ Detroit Public Television"



Building Relationships Radio

Saturday, October 16, 2010


"The 5 Love Languages on
Detroit Public Television"

 Dr. Gary Chapman



Co-host

Chris and Andrea Fabry



Saturday, October 16, 2010
Building Relationships Radio
"The 5 Love Languages on
Detroit Public Television"
Dr. Gary Chapman


Millions of people have benefitted from the insights given by Dr. Gary Chapman in his bestselling book, The 5 Love Languages®. On the next Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, we'll take you to a special broadcast Gary did with Detroit Public Television laying out the simple, biblical truth of the love languages. Don't miss this encouraging hour..

Featured Resources:
The 5 Love Languages® by Dr. Gary Chapman
The 5 Love Languages® with Dr. Gary Chapman DVD

Tune in to Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, the weekly radio broadcast brought to you by Moody Radio and Moody Publishers. Listen live online Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. CST at moodyradio.org, check your local radio station, or download free podcasts and get more information.


View an archive of past emails
Link: MBN Radio Live Stream
Building Relationships Radio
11:00 a.m. Eastern Time



The 5 Love Languages® by Dr. Gary Chapman


Friday, October 1, 2010

Love Language Minute ~ Love Says, "I'm Sorry." ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 2, 2010 ~ "Shepherding Women in Pain" by Dr. Bev Hislop ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman

"Shepherding Women in Pain"
Real Women, Real Issues and What You Need to Know to Truly Help
by Dr. Bev Hislop

Dr. Bev Hislop
Associate Professor of Pastoral Care to Women at Western Seminary in Portland, Oregon.
Bev and Jim have two married children and six living grandchildren. Jim is lead pastor at a local church in Clackamas, Oregon.

Dr. Gary Chapman


Love Language Minute ~ Love Says, "I'm Sorry." ~ Building Relationships Radio ~ Saturday, October 2, 2010 ~ "Shepherding Women in Pain" by Dr. Bev Hislop ~ Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman


Love Says, "I'm Sorry."
Dr. Gary Chapman

Love means never having to say, "I'm sorry."
Did the movie Love Story get it right when it advised us that true love means never having to say, "I'm sorry?" I don't think so, for one simply reason - we are all human. And humans are not perfect. All of us end up hurting the persons we love most. Having a good marriage does not demand perfection, but it does require us to apologize when we fail.
 
When I say, "I'm sorry" I'm expressing regret that my words or behavior have brought pain to you. When is the last time you said, "I'm sorry," to your husband or wife? If it's been a while, then you probably owe them an apology. Love means always being willing to say, "I'm sorry."

There's more to an apology than saying "I'm sorry."
Perhaps you have said, "I'm sorry,"  but your spouse is finding it hard to forgive you. So you feel frustrated and are saying to yourself, "I apologized what else can I do?" If you really want to break down the barriers, ask your spouse this question: "What can I do to make this up to you? I know I hurt you and I feel badly about it, but I want to make it right. I feel like I want to do something to show you that I love you."
 
This is far more powerful than simply saying "I'm sorry." Here you are trying to make restitution. You are trying to demonstrate that you really care about your relationship. After all, what your spouse wants to know is "are you sincere in your apology?"
 
Why are you sorry?
When you apologize to your spouse, what do you say? For many the answer is: "I'm sorry." But do you tell them what you are sorry for? An apology has more impact when it's specific. "I'm sorry that I got home late. I know that you worked hard to be ready on time, and I show up 15 minutes late. I feel badly that I've made you wait. I hope you will forgive me and we can still have a good evening." This kind of apology communicates that you are aware that your behavior inconvenienced your spouse and that you feel badly about it.

Here's one that you should never use. "I'm sorry that you got hurt." That shifts the blame to your spouse. It says, "If you weren't so sensitive, everything would be all right." Far better to say, "I'm sorry that my behavior hurt you."

Wait.... who's to blame?
"I'm sorry, but if you had not provoked me, I would not have lost my temper." That is not an apology. It is blaming your spouse for your poor behavior. Sincere regret needs to stand alone. It should not be followed with "But..." One husband said, "Her apologies always come across as attacks on me. She says she's sorry, but then she turns around and blames me. To me that's not an apology."

How about you? When you say, "I'm sorry," do you use the word "but"? If so, then you're not apologizing. You are blaming. You are creating resentment inside your spouse. They have a hard time forgiving you because in their mind you are not apologizing. In the future, try eliminating the "buts".

Taking responsibility for your behavior
Sometimes we hurt people and don't realize it. It certainly was not intentional. Good marriages are fostered by expressing regret even when we didn't intend to hurt them. If you bump someone getting off an elevator, you probably say, "I'm sorry." Why would you not do this with your spouse? You may not realize that your behavior has upset your spouse, but when it becomes apparent, then you can say, "I'm sorry that my behavior caused you so much pain. I didn't intend to hurt you, but I know I did. I feel badly about it, and I hope you will forgive me."

Sincere apologies make it easier for your husband or wife to forgive you. You don't have to be perfect to have a good marriage. But you must deal with your failures. "I'm sorry" is a key ingredient to a loving marriage.


Adapted from The Five Languages of Apology by Dr. Gary Chapman and Dr. Jennifer Thomas.




Building Relationships Radio 

Saturday, October 2, 2010


"Shepherding Women in Pain"

Dr. Bev Hislop

with

Dr. Gary Chapman


Co-host

Chris and Andrea Fabry




Saturday, October 2, 2010
Building Relationships Radio
"Shepherding Women in Pain"
by Dr. Bev Hislop


Women in America face an onslaught of obstacles and disappointments. From depression to domestic abuse, addictions to abortion recovery, women in the church are hurting. On this edition of Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, Dr. Bev Hislop joins us to talk about shepherding women in pain. If you care about women in your family or your congregation, don't miss listening to this epsiode. The featured resources for this broadcast is  by Dr. Bev Hislop.

Featured resource: Shepherding Women in Pain by Dr. Bev Hislop.

Tune in to Building Relationships with Dr. Gary Chapman, the weekly radio broadcast brought to you by Moody Radio and Moody Publishers. Listen live online Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. CST at moodyradio.org, check your local radio station, or download free podcasts and get more information.


View an archive of past emails


Link:   MBN Radio Live Stream 
Building Relationships Radio
11:00 a.m. Eastern Time


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